Route 09 : Daepyeong - Hwasun Olle

Routes

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EN
CH
JP
Total Distance : 6.7Km  Total Time : 3-4hour   Difficulty :

Start off at the small and cozy port, Daepyeong-pogu following an old Moljil(horse path) and encounter Baksugijeong, a vast meadow on top of a cliff. In the old days, Jeju’s finest quality ponies were raised at Baksuijeong, shipped to Daepyeong-pogu(port) through moljil and sent to the Yuan Dynasty. Baksuijeong continues to Bollenang-gil(silverberry pathway) with lots of linden trees. Weolla-bong(peak)’s uphill is challenging, but the beautiful scenery on the way is worthwhile. The shiny golden sand beach greets you at the finishing point.


No wheelchair accessible area on this route.

Wheelchair Accessible Area

*Click the route to see wheelchair accessible area

Route Tip

Pack something to eat because there is no store or restaurant until the finishing point. The route isn’t too long, so you could go for a late lunch at Hwasun Village where the finishing point is.

Olle Trail Ranger


It is not a problem even if it is your first time to the Jeju Olle Trail.
Let go of the fear of an unfamiliarity and bring excitement for new encounters.
  • Hur, Sung Wook

We connect with trails around the world

The Jeju Olle Foundation launched a global marketing project to promote the Jeju Olle Trail, twinning a course to a trail abroad. You can find Jeju Olle outside Korea at 11 different Friendship Trails in Greece, Italy, Canada, United Kingdom, Switzerland, Japan, Turkey, Taiwan, Australia, and Lebanon.

09 Jeju Olle Friendship Trail

Lebanon Mountain Trail


  • Location : Niha ~ Jezzin
  • Difficulty : Medium
  • Distance : 11.8km, 3 hours

The Lebanon Mountain Trail is the first long-distance hiking trail in Lebanon. It extends 450km the village of Andqet in the north of Lebanon to Marjaayoun in the south, meandering through or near 75 towns and villages at altitude ranging 600 meters to 2,000 meters above sea level. The LMT showcases the natural beauty and cultural wealth of Lebanon's mountains and brings Lebanese communities closer together through environmentally and socially-responsible tourism. The LMT logo embodies Lebanon’s snow-covered mountains (white) and the Tyrian purple evokes the dye extracted the murex shell. Lebanon Mountain Trail Route 21 is twinned with Jeju Olle Trail Route 9.

Public Transportation Information

The public transportation system of Jeju Island has been entirely changed recently and still it's changing. Please double check the up-to-date information of the bus number and route before you take it.

*Click the image to download mobile app

Foreign Language Interpretation Services by Tourism Organizations



[Visit Jeju] Jeju Travel Hot Line(Multi language interpretation service)
- +82 -(0)64-740-6000 / Chat service via mobile app also Available
- Operation Hour : Daily 09:00 ~ 18:00



[KTO] 1330 Korea Travel Hotline(Multi language interpretation service)
- Dial 1330 or though mobile app.
- Operation Hour: 24/7

How to find the Starting Point
How to find the way back from the Finishing Point
Daepyeong-pogu(port)

Daepyeong-ri is a small village with one more name, 'Nanduru', for its open field stretching afar the ocean. Haenyeos perform at Daepyeong-pogu(port) surrounded by Baksugijeong(pathway on the cliffs)

Moljil(horse path)

It is the path where horses traveled. It was built back in the Koryo Dynasty to move the horses grazed in the mid-mountainous areas of the west Jeju Daepyeong-pogu(port) to the Won Dynasty.

Baksugijeong(pathway on the cliffs)

It is cliff standing next to Daepyeong-pogu(port). ‘Gijeong’ means cliff in Jeju dialect. The word 'Baksu' means to drink the spring water coming out of the bedrock 1 meter above ground with a gourd bowl. Because the spring water is known to be good for skin, people used to have celebration of bathing with this water in mid-July(by the lunar calendar).

Ollangiso(Andeok Valley)

Ducks visits the place in winter and spring and it is named after ‘duck’s place’. Its surroundings are beautiful and calm, attracting villagers to come for a bath until the early 1980s.